Kunstkammer/Wunderkammer (Cabinet of Curiosities)

During the Renaissance period Kings, Princes and other aristocrats who had an intellectual and adventurous bent (and wanted to show off their sophistication and wealth), created what was known as a Kunstkammer or Wunderkammer – a Cabinet of Curiosities.

What did those cabinets contain?  Well, first of all, the word “cabinet” most often referred to an actual room – not a traditional piece of furniture.  Nowadays we do have curiosity cabinets; small display units that hang on the wall or stand on the floor with glass windows to display the owner’s collection of items they’re passionate about.  Those are a direct influence and to some extent the same purpose as the Wunderkammers of old – just on a smaller scale.

In reading about the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II and his support for alchemy, Hermeticism, and other Rosicrucian-type interests (much to the chagrin of the Catholic leadership in Rome), I came to discover this term Kunstkammer.  Rudolf had one that was the largest of its kind at the time – unrivaled anywhere in Europe. It apparently was a wonder to behold and housed in his palace at Prague.  Unfortunately there is nothing left of it after the Swedish forces plundered it when they took Prague in 1648.

Thanks to some early writings during the period we have some old woodcut illustrations of how these Wunderkammers may have appeared:

wk01 wk02 wk03 wk04 wk05These rooms contained whatever artifacts the owner desired. During the renaissance adventurers were returning from exotic places around the world.  Many discoveries were made particularly in terms of nature and the animal kingdom.  Frequently these Wunderkammers would contain collections of rare and bizarre creatures and other items found on these global travels.  Contents could also include antiquities, rare manuscripts, rocks & minerals, religious relics, works of art, scientific and medical instruments, automatons, etc.

These collections are a physical tribute and symbol to the mysteries of the universe and discovery.  They were the precursor to modern museums.  Unfortunately nearly all of them were decimated or liquidated long, long ago.

Even as time goes on, and museums established, the common man with limited resources still found a passion to display their prized collection. It might be a shadow box, curio cabinet, a corner of an office, or the decorative theme of a home library.

wk20 wk21 wk22 wk23 wk24 wk25 wk26The key here, I think, are exceptional individuals called by their interests – to pursue, collect, and display the fruits of their passions – those elements that resonate with their souls.  The display might be an overt attempt to impress their visitors, but more often than not I believe it is a creation of aesthetics; a way to surround themselves with objects that enhance and drive their imagination, creativity and enrichment of life.

I’m always impressed with interesting personal libraries and collections of modern individuals, but I haven’t discovered one any more impressive than Jay Walker’s Library of the History of Human Imagination.  I would dearly love to spend days immersing myself in its wonders!

My personal library is a constant work in progress/passion – all because I absolutely love surrounding myself with an artistic and intellectual aesthetic that fuels my creative drive and appeal to wonder.  I believe this is the intent of most of us who share the passion to create our own personal Wunderkammers – a tribute to the wondrousness of the world and its inspiration for us.

Satiate your soul with the wonders of the Universe!  Embrace the fascination and excitement of new discovery!  Dive deep into the little-known and unappreciated gems of the world!  Enrich your life!

 

 

Walker Library of the History of Human Imagination

One of the things that satiates my soul and ignites a spark of excitement, awe and wonder is a gorgeous and robust library.  There are two reasons for this.

  1. The vision of a plethora of books ignites a fire within.  I see the myriad of bindings lining the shelves and immediately imagine a wealth of knowledge, adventure, and discovery in their volumes!  Each tome an element on the road to ultimate Truth.
  2. But books alone don’t fulfill the equation with regards to A stunning library.  The aesthetics of the structure’s architecture and decor add an additional element of magic and excitement to the visitor’s experience.  Shouldn’t the surroundings invite the artistic and adventurous side of us to participate as well as the intellectual?

I salivate over photos and articles about the most incredible libraries around the world, and will be sharing some of those in the future.  For today though, I want to feature a more modern library that looks incredible – Jay Walker’s Library of the History of Human Imagination.

01JWL02JWL04JWL

05JWL06JWL07JWL08JWL09JWL10JWL11JWL12JWL13JWL14JWL15JWL16JWL17JWLJay Walker was the founder of PriceLine.com and Walker Digital.  He built this 3,600 square foot library which is part of his large home in Ridgefield, CT.  It’s an invitation-only private library.

The glass panels of the staircases are etched glass by artist Clyde Lynds. There are about 200 of them each showing human inventions over time.  Hidden LED lighting illuminate all the panels by computer.  Music is also computer controlled.

A video tour:

What a blissful place of discovery, imagination and knowledge!  My personal library doesn’t hold a candle to this masterpiece, but it does serve my intellectual and aesthetic passions (for the budget I have).

🙂