Your Purpose and Mission in Life

Why should anyone be concerned with identifying their Purpose and Mission in life?  What good is it?  Will it really make any difference with living life in this hodgepodge world of the mundane and chaotic?

What’s the difference between Purpose, Mission and Vision?  Do I need big goals to have a Purpose and Mission?  Or is it the other way around?  Is this some kind of useless, fuzzy-bullshit, corporate or new age stuff?

Hang on, let’s see what it means for you . . .


What Are The Benefits of Identifying a Personal Purpose & Mission?

Do you bounce around life in an uncontrolled fashion not really knowing why you’re doing something – like a cork tossed about on the surface of a stormy sea?

Are you dissatisfied and frustrated with life? Do you have an anxiousness within; a nagging feeling that something isn’t right and there’s more to life than what you’re living?

Do you wonder if you’re here on Earth for a specific reason but have no idea how to identify that reason?

If so, then you could reap great rewards from taking the time to determine your personal Purpose and Mission in life.

Here are the compelling benefits:

  • Laser-like focus for your life; Avoid distractions; Eliminate wasted time and energy
  • Know what’s most important to you; Live a purpose-driven life with a sense of direction
  • Simplified decision-making – no waffling; Know exactly what you should or shouldn’t be doing
  • Live a life of certainty, confidence and self-esteem
  • Stay aligned with your critical personal core values, and attract people who have similar values
  • Change your life in an extremely positive way; get incredible results; Accomplish valuable goals; Impact the world; Leave a legacy
  • Experience a sense of energy, excitement, motivation, passion and gratitude
  • Know who you are – to the core; See the Big Picture
  • Experience in-depth happiness and satisfaction
  • Gain personal freedom and independence

Without identifying a personal Purpose and Mission you’re relinquishing your future to a haphazard road map of unquestioned turns and directions.

Don’t live with randomness, indecision, doubt, uncertainty, and confusion.

“You are the architect of your dreams.” – Andy Andrews



What is the Difference Between Purpose and Mission?

Purpose . . . Mission . . . Vision . . . Goals . . .  What’s the difference?  Don’t they all get you to where you need to go?

Maybe.  It depends on the order you tackle them.

If you simply start setting big goals without having identified your Purpose and Mission, you run the risk of choosing goals that others portray to you as important.  What good is it to pursue other people’s goals?  It just leads to dissatisfaction, frustration and unhappiness.

Most of the online resources don’t bother distinguishing a rigid difference across Purpose, Mission and Vision.  And even the ones who attempt it have varied success in conveying why you should even bother splitting hairs about the differences.

From a general perspective, here are the nuances:

PURPOSEWhy do you exist?  Why are you here?  Your purpose is the reason why you should be doing what you’re doing in life – your raison d’être. It brings excitement and passion to living. It’s the truest & deepest meaning of life for you.

MISSIONHow will you accomplish your purpose.? How will you get there?  How will you focus?  What will you do and How will you do it?  It’s about action.  Mission is your personal philosophy of what you hope to be and intend to accomplish, based on your Purpose.  It’s doing what matters and eliminating the distractions. What will you allow in your life and how will you positively influence others?

VISIONWhat will it look like when you arrive at your destination? Where do you want to be?  This is a mental picture of your optimal future state – the Result you want to obtain based on your Purpose and Mission. What does the difference you’ll make look like? It’s a vivid and inspirational mental picture of where you ultimately want to be in life. It inspires you to set goals.


Some workshop exercises ignore Purpose because it comes out within the Mission and Vision.  Others ignore Vision and focus on Purpose and Mission. Some identify Purpose as being the same as Mission.  If you follow the better workshop exercises, you’ll end up getting to the critical end-point either way, which is identifying your Purpose and Mission.

The way I see it:   Purpose drives Mission which, in turn, drives Vision, which drives Goals

Purpose —-> Mission —–> Vision —–> Goals

Here’s a nice visual I found on the web of a hierarchy that matches my conception of those four elements (top to bottom):

Several less-than-adequate resources will have you defining goals before you’ve identified your Purpose and Mission.  I adamantly DISAGREE.  It’s foolish to identify goals before Purpose and Mission.  That’s one of the problems with living your social conditioned life – because you’re likely to be convinced something outside you is your true Purpose and Mmission – when it is not.  You end up pursuing goals that others have identified for you as critical and valuable, and you mistakenly see them as important.  They’re not your true goals. This is a road to frustration and unhappiness.


How To Identify Your Life’s Purpose & Mission

The best method to determine your Personal Purpose and Mission is an exercise in self-discovery. You need to spend some quality quiet time with a series of introspective questions and an honest attempt on your part to self-discover.

The best online resources I’ve found with a great set of questions are nearly identical and can be found here:

Those two, by far, have the most effective set of questions to allow a proper introspective adventure and self-discovery.

A couple of decent runner-ups (but not quite as thorough) include:


Introspection time . . . Your Purpose

The first article noted above has fifteen excellent questions to identify your life Purpose, so I’ll list them here.

Find a quiet place and time. Take a pad of paper and write out your answers as quick as they come to you – the first thing that pops in your head. Be honest with yourself and don’t give other people’s answers.  Answer genuinely about you; from your gut.

Don’t edit.  Don’t second guess. Don’t change your answers.  Spend only about 30 to 60 seconds per question.

  1. What makes you smile? (activities, people, events, hobbies, projects, etc.)
  2. What are your favorite things to do in the past? What about now?
  3. What activities make you lose track of time?
  4. What makes you feel great about yourself?
  5. Who inspires you most? (Anyone you know or do not know. Family, friends, authors, artists, leaders, etc.) Which qualities inspire you, in each person?
  6. What are you naturally good at? (skills, abilities, gifts etc.)
  7. What do people typically ask you for help in?
  8. If you had to teach something, what would you teach?
  9. What would you regret not fully doing, being or having in your life?
  10. You are now 90 years old, sitting on a rocking chair outside your porch; you can feel the spring breeze gently brushing against your face. You are blissful and happy, and are pleased with the wonderful life you’ve been blessed with. Looking back at your life and all that you’ve achieved and acquired, all the relationships you’ve developed; what matters to you most? List them out.
  11. What are your deepest values?
  12. What were some challenges, difficulties and hardships you’ve overcome or are in the process of overcoming? How did you do it?
  13. What causes do you strongly believe in? Connect with?
  14. If you could get a message across to a large group of people. Who would those people be? What would your message be?
  15. Given your talents, passions and values. How could you use these resources to serve, to help, to contribute? ( to people, beings, causes, organization, environment, planet, etc.)

Go back through your answers and circle or highlight the words and phrases that jump out at you as the most important. Prioritize them from most important to least important.

After answering all those questions, pause and consider . . . what are you truly passionate about?

Combine that passion with your prioritized words into a sentence or two that best describes your purpose.

Bonus Introspection:

I had four memorable introspective events that helped solidify my Purpose.

  • My first encounter with any kind of exercise in a Personal Purpose or Mission was probably about 1995, in the early days of the web.  I had become interested in self-improvement and success and came across a brief exercise online someone had written – probably for identifying life goals.  It had a major impact on me, stopping me in my tracks and forcing me to look inward for genuine answers to my true purpose – not just pursuing monetary “success” in life at the expense of all else – instead, something real and significant.

The scenario? (similar to #10 above)

Imagine yourself on your Deathbed. Look back over your life and where it’s brought you in this moment.  What will you need to have done and accomplished to feel that you lived life well?  A fulfilling life?  Throughout life, what’s been most important to you as you ready yourself for death?

  • Then, about three-to-five years ago, I found a particularly significant question in an introspective exercise.  This made a huge difference for me.  Identifying a Gnawing Purpose:

Think back over your entire childhood, adolescence and early adulthood.  What is it that continually came up over and over through those years that was very important to you – a passion for you? Something gnawing at you that you couldn’t let go and forget – or outgrow?  A relentless feeling to pursue something. What was the repetitive theme, value, or activity?

  • In late 2012, I went though a process to identify my Core Personal Values.  This, too, really helped zero in on my Purpose.  (#11 above)
  • I’ve always had an issue with procrastination and lack of action to implement my biggest desires (due to recurring fear, self-doubt and perfectionism).  In late 2015 I finally bit the bullet and decided I wanted to take action on what/how I wanted to leave a Legacy.  (Legacy is missing from the fifteen questions above, but appears in some of the other sources noted in this article.)  That’s what pushed me to the point of creating and focusing on this web site. I created it in January 2016 with the intent to write for whoever could relate – anyone with open ears, eyes and mind.  But my main focus was to perhaps influence one or more of my descendants to live beyond the norm; to excel and live a fulfilling life.
“While goals are chosen, a purpose is discovered. Our purpose is something we have been doing all along, and will continue to do, regardless of circumstances, until the day we die.”
― Peter McWilliams, Do It!

Your Mission Statement

The same article goes on to describe how to identify your life Mission:

A personal mission consists of 3 parts . . .

  • What do I want to do?
  • Who do I want to help?
  • What is the result? What value will I create?

Steps to Creating Your Personal Mission Statement:

  1. Do the exercise with the 15 questions above as quickly as you can.  [and the bonus introspections]
  2. List out action words you connect with.   (examples: educate, accomplish, empower, encourage, improve, help, give, guide, inspire, integrate, master, motivate, nurture, organize, produce, promote, travel, spread, share, satisfy, understand, teach, write, etc.)
  3. Based on your answers to the 15+ questions, list everything and everyone that you believe you can help.  (examples: people, creatures, organizations, causes, groups, environment, etc.)
  4. Identify your end goal. How will the ‘who from your above answer benefit from what you ‘do?
  5. Combine steps 2-4 into a sentence, or 2-3 sentences.  That should be your Mission Statement.

You personal Mission Statement should get you excited about life. It should be action oriented – describing what you want to do with your life and who/what will you impact.

Your life from this point forward should be guided by the results of this exercise.  Your Purpose and Mission will allow you to more easily make decisions based on what you should be doing with your life.  If new opportunities and activities arise that don’t align with your Purpose and Mission – don’t pursue them.

Mission Statement Tips:

– Keep it short & positive
– Make it emotional: It should infuse you with passion and ignite the fire within you
– Make it future-oriented & include the people who matter most

Your personal Purpose and Mission Statement should drive your Vision and Goals – pushing you to excel in the very thing you’re on the Earth to achieve.

This self-discovery exercise is powerful.  It will change your life. It will give you confidence and focus.

Go for it!


“A man should conceive of a legitimate purpose in his heart, and set out to accomplish it. He should make this purpose the centralizing point of his thoughts. He should make this purpose his supreme duty, and should devote himself to its attainment, not allowing his thoughts to wander away into ephemeral fancies, longings, and imaginings. This is the royal road to self-control and true concentration of thought.”      – James Allen, As a Man Thinketh


“Thought allied fearlessly to purpose becomes creative force: he who knows this is ready to become something higher and stronger than a mere bundle of wavering thoughts and fluctuating sensations; he who does this has become the conscious and intelligent wielder of his mental powers,”   – James Allen, As a Man Thinketh


Some of the best online sources for this topic:

As with any sourcing on the internet, links can go ‘dead’ after a time. If you find the above-mentioned links no longer working, try the WayBack Machine:    It’s sometimes a good way to pull up and view websites that are no longer active.


SpaceX – Engineering and Technology Awe & Wonder

What an incredible achievement by private enterprise that inspires and strikes me with awe and wonder . . .

(video starts at 8:00 minute mark)

I just love the way SpaceX does their launch coverage: allowing a huge crowd inside mission control, young energetic people to describe what’s going on, people of both sexes working within mission control, and video cameras mounted everywhere showing you live what’s going on, before and throughout the actual launch.

It’s also extremely impressive how they display the capability of launching a large number of missions in such a short period of time. For instance: They’ve had five launches in just under two months, including this one.  They had eighteen launches in all of 2017!

What a remarkable company, employing accomplished engineers, technicians, specialists, etc! AMAZING. And this time . . . having some fun with it too by using Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster and Starman dummy as the payload to a Mars orbit. This is very inspiring and gives me goosebumps while watching – in total awe at the marvel of the engineering used – particularly the return and landing of the booster rockets. THAT is a fantastic accomplishment in and of itself.

Government-funded NASA could never match these type of accomplishments, nor the costs.

Total inspiration!



Values – Personal Core


What Exactly Are Values?

Value can fall into several arenas:

  1. Economic – the material worth of something compared to the monetary price paid.
  2. Utility/Importance – something held in high regard due to its usefulness or importance to you.
  3. Aesthetic – this could technically be a part of Utility/Importance, above, but has a more specific relation to art, beauty, harmony and nature such that it elicits a pleasurable experience for the viewer.
  4. Personal-Core/Ethical – what’s most important to you in life; the guiding principles of your life that dictate action & behavior; it defines who you are.

The primary focus of this article is #4 – Personal Core values.  These are principles, standards or convictions we feel are deeply important to our lives.  Theoretically, these elements of our core should drive our daily activities and behavior – serving as a compass or beacon for our actions.  They are instilled in us culturally throughout our life as we grow and learn.

Rarely, though, does anyone attempt to actually identify their core values.  Because of this, and the chaos and lack of focus they experience daily, they find themselves with a nagging feeling something is missing.  Let’s change that.  Let’s live life with self-confidence and direction. Let’s make better and more confident decisions.  Let’s eliminate the time vampires in our lives if they don’t align with our values.  Let’s embrace what’s really important and drive up our joy and happiness quotient.



A “Default” Life

It’s so easy to get caught up in the day-to-day chaos.  Our attention is yanked left and right by the pressing urgency of our work & personal lives, and this is compounded by HUGE distractions thrown in our face every day via daily news drama.

If we choose NOT to take an active role in our life direction, it takes zero effort to allow our lives to be pulled into the mire of mundane chaos, depression and hopelessness that seems to surround us.  Days, weeks, months and years pass by; what have we really accomplished?  Are we happy? Or are we frustrated and exhausted?

Did we do what’s required of us in our job?  Did we do what’s required of us for our family, spouse, kids?  Did we do what’s required of us by any social or religious organizations? Did we vent a sigh of relief when we finally were able to sit and idle our minds and body once our daily regimen of responsible duties are complete?

Then……what did we do?  Did we tackle the important things in our personal lives that matters to us as individuals?  Did we pick up the activities we consider passions and pursue them with satisfied pleasure?  Or, were we too pooped-out for our passions?

This describes a “default” life – trying to live by a myriad of other values rather than yours (friend’s, church, education, professional/career, political, etc.).  The result is dissatisfaction, restlessness and anxiety . . . knowing something isn’t right . . . your life isn’t in control.


Moving Towards Living a ‘Designed’ Life

By identifying your core values you can live a more directed life, make more intelligent and better decisions, and focus on the things that really matter to you.  Having these values in the forefront of your mind helps you clearly identify priorities, eliminate drains on your time and energy, and enjoy a more focused, joyful life. You don’t get yanked about in an aimless direction by anything and everything that comes your way.  We should strive to live a life by “design” rather than by “default.”

Don’t get me wrong, the myriad of demands and choices doesn’t stop coming your way.  But by knowing your core values you’re prepared to take a stand and make decisions about what you focus upon.



How to Identify Your Core Values

This type of activity can be found in personal improvement books and websites.  You can simply Google core values or core values list and find many sites with lists and exercises to accomplish the task.

A couple of the best sites I found are linked below.  Each of these requires you to spend some time on introspection and reflection rather than just picking values from a list:

A couple of sites that have nice lists of values:


There are many benefits of living around your core values: satisfaction, contentment, happiness, fulfillment, purpose, meaning, peace of mind, self-confidence, harmony, success.  These are the result of living an authentic life without confusion, guilt or shame.


Is this activity producing value?

You’ll feel a sense of discovery and satisfaction after developing your list of top values.  Review it periodically as a continual reminder of what’s deeply important to you.

Each day, find ways to focus on activities that align with those values.  Eliminate as many activities and areas of focus that do not align.  (I wouldn’t recommend quitting your source of income, unless you have your dream job already lined up.)

The minutes of your life are finite.  Use them the best way possible, rather than squandering them aimlessly.  Make your life the best it can be.

Consider some of the following throughout your days and weeks:

  • Are the hours of my life creating value for me?
  • Does the decision I’m about to make align with my values?
  • Is the activity I’m about to partake in going to produce value in my life?  Does it support my core values?
  • Is the purchase I’m about to make going to provide value to my life?  Does it support my core values?


My Values

I went through an exercise five to ten years ago to identify my values.  They are (in no particular order):

  • Discovery/Learning/Knowledge, Truth/Accuracy, Beauty/Aesthetics, Growth/Self-Actualization, Freedom/Self-Reliance/Individualism, Integrity, Justice, Results, Creating/Building

Yes, this is more than the 5 or 10 the articles suggest.  However, I resonate with all of them and enjoy the reminder of their importance to my life.  Ultimately these values are what drove my selection of the Categories and Sub-categories used on this blog.

I use these to identify my life’s goals and document the important focal activities to pursue in something called a Strategy On A Page (SOAP).  This SOAP includes a list of those values plus areas of aligning focus for my life’s interests and pursuits.  I reference this through the year to ensure alignment to what’s most important.

The whole process of identifying and embracing my values has created more happiness and contentment in my life – a goal we should all embrace!



As with any sourcing on the internet, links can go ‘dead’ after a time. If you find the above-mentioned links no longer working, try the WayBack Machine:    It’s sometimes a good way to pull up and view websites that are no longer active.





Carpe Diem!

Over the last several months my wonderful wife bought some really nice pop-open cards, all titled “CARPE DIEM.”  She hides them here-and-there for me to find and writes something sweet on the back of them.

1029162348a_hdrAfter popping open the perforated cover of the card, inside each is a quote that shares an inspiring thought for personal growth and self-actualization.  This is particularly nice because it fits right into the niche I’ve been passionately pursuing for the last couple of decades – to learn, to grow, to live fully, to expand my horizons!

Some of the quotes:

“Plunge boldly into the thick of life, and seize it where you will.”   – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

“Visualize this thing you want. See it, feel it, believe in it. Make your mental blueprint and begin”     – Robert Collier

“If you want your life to be a magnificent story, then begin by realizing that you are the author and everyday you have the opportunity to write a new page.”    – Mark Houlahan

“… parade through each day convinced that every task… brings you closer to fulfilling your dreams.”     – Og Mandino

“Don’t count the days, make the days count.”     – Muhammad Ali

“Know the true value of time; snatch, seize, and enjoy every moment of it.”     – Earl of Chesterfield

“Live daringly, boldly, fearlessly.”     – Henry J. Kaiser

“The future is always beginning now.”     – Mark Strand

“Wake up with a smile and go after life.”     – Joe Kapp

“Make each day your masterpiece.”     – John Wooden

“It’s time to start living the life you’ve imagined.”     – Henry James

“The future starts today, not tomorrow.”     – Pope John Paul II

“We know nothing of tomorrow; our business is to be good and happy today.”     – Sydney Smith

“What we do today, right now, will have an accumulated effect on all our tomorrows.”   – Alexandra Stoddard

“Each day comes to me with both hands full of possibilities…”     – Helen Keller

“Dare to live the life you have dreamed for yourself. Go forward and make your dreams come true.”     – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Let the winds of enthusiasm sweep through you. Live today with gusto.”     – Dale Carnegie

“Go for it now. The future is promised to no one.”     – Wayne Dyer

“Each day comes bearing its own gifts. Untie the ribbons.”    – Ruth Ann Schabacker

“Grab life by the handlebars.”     – Unknown



Awe & Wonder

A key part of an enriched life is to allow yourself to regularly experience a sense of awe and wonder.  Life without wonder is stale and mundane – a formula for restlessness, anxiety and outright depression.

Wonder is the first of all the passions.”   – Rene Descartes

What does “awe” and  “wonder” mean exactly?  Various definitions, Wikipedia entries and online articles define these concepts in a very sterile manner.  A lot of these like to split hairs about differences between the two concepts.  I’m less concerned with this type of definitional nitpicking and more interested in how they can inspire, provide joy and satiate the soul.

So what is it?  From my perspective, I see two essential elements that drive awe and wonder:

  1. Any element of nature, art, music, literature, science/technology or the spiritual/religious far enough outside our habitual familiarity (normality) that can cause us to be suddenly amazed, blown away, inspired, excited, astonished, reverent, emotional and appreciating.  The things that come to mind include grand & gorgeous vistas, mountains, waterfalls, starry skies, the immense universe, a magnificent storm, an extraordinary piece of art, marvelous music, etc.  It can even include a reaction of amazement, satisfaction and admiration noticing something simple such as a blooming flower or a spider and its intricate web – things that normally escape our notice but brings us back to a child-like appreciation and wonder.
  2. One element that I feel is sadly overlooked in most people’s minds when considering awe and wonder is something for which I can attest provides immense joy & satisfaction – knowledge discoveryKnowledge Adventurers have a definite opportunity to experience awe and wonder while uncovering heretofore unknown extraordinary facts and incredible truths (unknown, at least to ourselves and most culturally indoctrinated people).

We should love and embrace dazzling beauty. . . . aesthetics & literature . . . . human achievement . . . . a beautiful puzzling mystery . . . . as well as elegant thought.   Open our minds to experiencing new things . . . . elicit curiosity . . . . engage and enliven our senses . . . . allow ourselves to be inspired and uplifted . . . . to pause in life for contemplation of nature and reality . . . . feeling the joy in simple pleasures . . . . embracing a heightened state of consciousness . . . .

This infusion of joy and satisfaction doesn’t come without some effort on our part. We must be open to such experiences.  Spending our entire lives inside the office or sitting on the couch watching television will not produce awe and wonder.  Never questioning anything will not produce awe and wonder.  Never venturing beyond your normalcy and comfort zone will not produce awe and wonder.

We need to make it a point to get out in nature and truly appreciate its beauty and wonder.  Get out . . . . pause . . . . release your tension . . . . observe and notice the simple as well as the grand . . . . look at things in a new way . . . . don’t take anything for granted . . . . ask questions about what you see . . . look for new answers to old questions . . . . soak it up . . . . be curious . . . . be humble . . . . open your heart . . . . be like a child.

“The Child is father of the Man” – William Wordsworth

“The Child is father of the Man” – William Wordsworth


We wonder and awe constantly as a child. Unfortunately we go to school to have the world’s answers pounded into our head – whether truly accurate or not.  The mystery is removed.  Our curiosity is banished.  We enter adulthood and become suffocated by work, bills, consumerism, television, and any number of things that encompass the truly mundane. The comfort of our confirmation bias takes over and we don’t want anything to change or our indoctrinated beliefs to be challenged.

We come to accept:
– Conform, don’t question what’s assumed to be true
– Be complacent & acquiesce, don’t challenge the status quo
– Go along, don’t rock the boat
– Blend in, don’t stand out of the herd
– Settle for the mundane, don’t be inspired
– Ignore your boring sterile environs, continue to separate yourself from natural beauty
– Embrace the ugly and mundane
– Expect nothing and wish for less

Is this the life you desire?  I think not.


“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead —his eyes are closed.” – Albert Einstein

“Mankind will not perish for want of information; but only for want of appreciation. The beginning of our happiness lies in the understanding that life without wonder is not worth living . What we lack is not a will to believe but a will to wonder.”  – Abraham Joshua Heschel

A couple of good online articles:

As with any sourcing on the internet, links can go ‘dead’ after a time. If you find the above-mentioned links no longer working, try the WayBack Machine:    It’s sometimes a good way to pull up and view websites that are no longer active.

Bull & Bear Pub

This may seem rather trivial to most (I have to remind myself I’m not writing to “most“), but a large part of my appreciation and embellishment for an enriched life consists of surrounding myself with a rich sensory aesthetic that speaks to my inner core.  Therefore, based on my own personal tastes and passions, that aesthetic always involves elements of knowledge, discovery, learning, beauty, truth.

On a recent Royal Caribbean cruise with my beautiful wife, daughter and son-in-law on the Freedom of the Seas, we found ourselves looking for interesting places to relax and unwind after a day of exciting excursions.  The Bull & Bear pub on the the ship’s interior promenade was such a welcoming place. While I haven’t yet traveled to the British Isles it did give me a feeling of a unique and inspiring place to imbibe and converse – one that may perhaps exist in spirit somewhere in Great Britain.


0729161932aThe place was rather empty during the day while travelers were either on the pool deck or if docked, on an excursion, but in the evenings it was packed with patrons sampling beer and partaking in the wonderful music of a lone guitarist/singer who did such an incredible job rendering vintage hits from the 70s and 80s.  Debbie and I are not beer drinkers but they did have a decent selection of wine.

The specific aesthetic elements that caught my attention and spoke to my soul were part of the interior, and to some extent the exterior, which seemed to cater to the knowledge adventurer and discoverer!  Along the side of the pub was a wall lined with what appears to be a well-stocked library (probably a facsimile).  And in the middle, a display case of “evolutionary” skulls (no doubt replicas).

0726161923d0726161923a0726161923cStill . . . . . . not only did the interior speak to me, but the exterior also held some interesting surprises.  In a similar manner to the skulls display inside, the exterior windows held an interesting (although nearly hidden) shadow-box-type display of a Cabinet of Curiosities!  The frustrating part was the glass covering this display was colored/frosted in such a way that its contents were nearly hidden in their entirety.  I attempted to snap some photos in an attempt to capture their mysteries:

0729161928a 0729161927b 0729161927aMuch in the same way that the Kunstkammer of old attempts to display an array of interesting and inspiring discoveries, this window shows a skull, armillary, coral, atlas, fish, shells, intellectual diagrams, etc – all items of discovery and adventure.

If I have to choose a place of relaxation and satiation – this type of establishment calls to my soul in spades – compared to someplace of sterile blandness.

Live life fully! Pursue experiences and settings that satiate your soul!




Kunstkammer/Wunderkammer (Cabinet of Curiosities)

During the Renaissance period Kings, Princes and other aristocrats who had an intellectual and adventurous bent (and wanted to show off their sophistication and wealth), created what was known as a Kunstkammer or Wunderkammer – a Cabinet of Curiosities.

What did those cabinets contain?  Well, first of all, the word “cabinet” most often referred to an actual room – not a traditional piece of furniture.  Nowadays we do have curiosity cabinets; small display units that hang on the wall or stand on the floor with glass windows to display the owner’s collection of items they’re passionate about.  Those are a direct influence and to some extent the same purpose as the Wunderkammers of old – just on a smaller scale.

In reading about the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II and his support for alchemy, Hermeticism, and other Rosicrucian-type interests (much to the chagrin of the Catholic leadership in Rome), I came to discover this term Kunstkammer.  Rudolf had one that was the largest of its kind at the time – unrivaled anywhere in Europe. It apparently was a wonder to behold and housed in his palace at Prague.  Unfortunately there is nothing left of it after the Swedish forces plundered it when they took Prague in 1648.

Thanks to some early writings during the period we have some old woodcut illustrations of how these Wunderkammers may have appeared:

wk01 wk02 wk03 wk04 wk05These rooms contained whatever artifacts the owner desired. During the renaissance adventurers were returning from exotic places around the world.  Many discoveries were made particularly in terms of nature and the animal kingdom.  Frequently these Wunderkammers would contain collections of rare and bizarre creatures and other items found on these global travels.  Contents could also include antiquities, rare manuscripts, rocks & minerals, religious relics, works of art, scientific and medical instruments, automatons, etc.

These collections are a physical tribute and symbol to the mysteries of the universe and discovery.  They were the precursor to modern museums.  Unfortunately nearly all of them were decimated or liquidated long, long ago.

Even as time goes on, and museums established, the common man with limited resources still found a passion to display their prized collection. It might be a shadow box, curio cabinet, a corner of an office, or the decorative theme of a home library.

wk20 wk21 wk22 wk23 wk24 wk25 wk26The key here, I think, are exceptional individuals called by their interests – to pursue, collect, and display the fruits of their passions – those elements that resonate with their souls.  The display might be an overt attempt to impress their visitors, but more often than not I believe it is a creation of aesthetics; a way to surround themselves with objects that enhance and drive their imagination, creativity and enrichment of life.

I’m always impressed with interesting personal libraries and collections of modern individuals, but I haven’t discovered one any more impressive than Jay Walker’s Library of the History of Human Imagination.  I would dearly love to spend days immersing myself in its wonders!

My personal library is a constant work in progress/passion – all because I absolutely love surrounding myself with an artistic and intellectual aesthetic that fuels my creative drive and appeal to wonder.  I believe this is the intent of most of us who share the passion to create our own personal Wunderkammers – a tribute to the wondrousness of the world and its inspiration for us.

Satiate your soul with the wonders of the Universe!  Embrace the fascination and excitement of new discovery!  Dive deep into the little-known and unappreciated gems of the world!  Enrich your life!



Walker Library of the History of Human Imagination

One of the things that satiates my soul and ignites a spark of excitement, awe and wonder is a gorgeous and robust library.  There are two reasons for this.

  1. The vision of a plethora of books ignites a fire within.  I see the myriad of bindings lining the shelves and immediately imagine a wealth of knowledge, adventure, and discovery in their volumes!  Each tome an element on the road to ultimate Truth.
  2. But books alone don’t fulfill the equation with regards to A stunning library.  The aesthetics of the structure’s architecture and decor add an additional element of magic and excitement to the visitor’s experience.  Shouldn’t the surroundings invite the artistic and adventurous side of us to participate as well as the intellectual?

I salivate over photos and articles about the most incredible libraries around the world, and will be sharing some of those in the future.  For today though, I want to feature a more modern library that looks incredible – Jay Walker’s Library of the History of Human Imagination.


05JWL06JWL07JWL08JWL09JWL10JWL11JWL12JWL13JWL14JWL15JWL16JWL17JWLJay Walker was the founder of and Walker Digital.  He built this 3,600 square foot library which is part of his large home in Ridgefield, CT.  It’s an invitation-only private library.

The glass panels of the staircases are etched glass by artist Clyde Lynds. There are about 200 of them each showing human inventions over time.  Hidden LED lighting illuminate all the panels by computer.  Music is also computer controlled.

A video tour:

What a blissful place of discovery, imagination and knowledge!  My personal library doesn’t hold a candle to this masterpiece, but it does serve my intellectual and aesthetic passions (for the budget I have).