What is “Mundane”?

 

What do I Mean by “Mundane”?

I use the word “mundane” frequently, and realized I should probably level-set on its meaning.
So . . .  what exactly is “mundane”?

From  my perspective and life-philosophy, the mundane in life is bare minimum “living.”

It looks something like this:

Work, eat, consume, zone out on media, sleep.
Wash, rinse, repeat.

Do the same thing day-after-day, week-after-week, year-after-year.

It’s about just getting through the work day, then escaping through television, social media, shopping, eating and drinking.  Life in a daily rut of routine.

Lower your life expectations to accomplish only the minimum to get by – – basic survival and escapism. Set the bar as low as you can for living.

Most people are:

  • not driven by passion for excelling
  • not driven by Purpose
  • not identifying with important core Values
  • not pursuing Growth and Self-Actualization
  • not achieving life goals
  • not pursuing an enriched life
  • not living with adventure

Instead, most simply become comfortable with routine, and routine only.

 

Can We Ignore the Mundane?

If we strive to be a self-actualizer, can we ignore the mundane in life?  No.
Should we shirk our mundane responsibilities?  No, not unless we arrange to pay others to do them for us.
Should we get satisfaction out of accomplishing mundane tasks?  Yes, I think we should.

However, the enriched living approach should be:

  • Tackle the mundane, get it out of the way.
  • THEN pursue the passion and excellence in our life’s Purpose and Mission.

Take whatever satisfaction you can with accomplishing the mundane, but know there is WAY more to living a life of purpose, joy and satisfaction.

Don’t let the sum of your life be a totality of mundaneness.  Move beyond it to realize greater potential and life happiness.  Pursue living an Enriched Life!

“Are you really living life . . .  Or are you just paying bills until you die?”

 

How to Move Beyond Mundaneness

Eliminate the time vampires in your life and do something – anything – beyond the mundane. Consciously use your time on this Earth better than letting it waste away.  Stop being a couch potato and choose to spend that time making life a bit more of an adventure. . .

Read books, learn something new, keep learning, develop a hobby, travel, tackle projects, build, create, write, visit parks, get out in nature, hike, kayak, visit museums, appreciate art, take up art (whether visual or performing), listen to beautiful music, go to art shows and other festivals, take family outings, go camping, find the magic in discovering history, explore your city, appreciate architecture, drive or walk through a historic neighborhood, visit beautiful landscape gardens, surround yourself with beauty, restore something old, develop a craft, collect something meaningful to you, unclutter your life of the things that aren’t important to you, go to concerts, redecorate or remodel your living space, learn new skills, try something new.

Get the idea?  Reach for more. Choose something that resonates with your interests. Don’t settle for the mundane as the only option for living.

Your efforts don’t have to be perfect.  The goal is to get out of the rut of the mundane and actually LIVE life doing the things that are truly important to your core.

Yes . . . .do the mundane, as a matter of being an element of life, just don’t get mired in the mundane.  Fit more substance into your life.

“Don’t live the same year 75 times and call it a life.”   – Robin Sharma

 

 

 

 

Growth and Self-Actualization

If you resonate with any of the messages presented to you in the writings on this site, you’re already of the mindset of someone who knows the importance of Growth and Self-Actualization.

But what is it exactly?  Why is it important – at least to some of us who are driven beyond the normal and mundane?

 

Growth

Personal Growth is the desire to self-develop yourself; to become more than you are today; to discover the possibilities within you; to achieve more in life (and I don’t necessarily mean material achievements).

Not all people are interested in personal growth.  I think it must be due to personality differences.  For me – and the audience I write for – the need to self-improve, self-discover, grow and expand your personal horizons is an important element of life.  I can’t get away from it.  It’s part of my personal being – part of my life’s Purpose and Mission – even before I went through the formality to determine them several years ago. I always knew deep within there was more to discover and more to accomplish. I had to take that path.

Growth doesn’t come from doing nothing, or doing the same thing over and over.  If during your waking hours you’re only working your job, watching TV, playing video games and sleeping, you won’t get Growth. It can’t happen. Couch Potato-ism doesn’t equal growth.

“If you always do what you’ve always done, you always get what you’ve always gotten.” – Jessie Potter

If you desire to live an enriched life in this mundane world, and you’re not living it now, then you must decide to do something different.  You need a burning desire within you to be more…. to do more…. to have an impact on yourself and others.  You need an internal fire within to grow as a human being towards your realized and exciting potential.

Growth comes in three opportunity packages:

  • Growth by starting something new
  • Growth by stopping something you are presently doing
  • Growth through the mistakes we make

You can see by this list that Growth requires action.  You have to start something new, stop something you’re doing, and/or make mistakes to learn valuable lessons.  Sitting secure in your comfort zone and doing nothing differently will not get you Growth.

“Seek opportunity, not security. A boat in a harbor is safe, but in time its bottom will rot out.” ― H. Jackson Brown Jr., Life’s Little Instruction Book

Make a decision to do something different.  Make a decision that will count for something critical to your best self.  Decide to grow – not rot.  Don’t sell yourself short.

“The story of the human race is the story of men and women selling themselves short.” – Abraham Maslow

 

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Perhaps you’ve heard of the Hierarchy of Needs?  It’s a psychological theory of motivation developed by Abraham Maslow, and is a step-by-step progression of human needs to be pursued for maximum satisfaction and happiness.  Here are the basics:

Think of a pyramid.  Human needs start at the bottom of the pyramid shown above and move upward as each is achieved.  Here’s the hierarchy in the order they’re typically met (bottom-to-top in the diagram):

  1. Physiological Needs – It starts at the bottom of the pyramid with the fact that people in a base/primitive existence will be trying to achieve physiological needs (air, water, food, sex – basic human survival needs).
  2. Safety Needs -Once the basic survival needs are met, people can then be concerned with basic safety and security issues around personal life, health and finances.
  3. Love & Belonging Needs – Assuming physiological and safety needs have been met, then people will gravitate towards gaining psychological needs of loving and belonging – feeling loved and accepted (friendships, family, relationships).
  4. Esteem – After achieving the prior three needs, we move to pursuing the needs of ego and social status.  We desire to be respected and valued by others.
  5. Self-actualization – After mastering esteem and the other needs, an industrious person can now work towards becoming the best self they can be.  To self-actualize.

Maslow called the first four needs basic or deficiency needs – meaning, they are a lack of something and are met externally.  The final need is called a growth need – and is not a lack of something externally but instead a desire for personal growth, which is met internally.

The growth need of self-actualization moves a person beyond other people’s opinions – or any external validation for that matter.  Its driven by a desire deep within us.

Not all needs have to be met in the precise order presented in the theory.  There are individuals who tackle their growth need at the same time as they’re working on some of their deficiency needs; there’s no hard-and-fast rule.

Self-Actualization

This article is concerned with the highest need – the growth need of “Self-Actualization.”

What does Self-Actualization really mean?

“What a man can be, he must be. This need we may call self-actualization…It refers to the desire for self-fulfillment, namely, to the tendency for him to become actualized in what he is potentially. This tendency might be phrased as the desire to become more and more what one is, to become everything that one is capable of becoming.” – Abraham Maslow, 1954, Motivation and Personality

This is a state of being; of self-awareness and concern for fulfilling your potential.  Maslow referred to those in this state as “self-actualizers.”

Growth and self-development is a lifelong process.  You really don’t ever get to a point where you can say you’ve completed your path to self-actualization.  It’s a process of wonderful growth and self-discovery, progressing continually to realize your potential.

Your Purpose and Mission should be a result of deep reflection and passion for what is critically important to your being, and this will directly drive your path to self-actualization.  Follow your passion and bliss.  Let it drive your life and its actions in fulfilling your potential. Live a life of self-discovery and adventure!

 

What are the Characteristics of a Self-Actualizer?

I have to admit that I hadn’t previously been exposed to Maslow’s list of characteristics for Self-Actualizers.  It’s quite an eye opener, and I see many that apply to my own life – particularly over the last 30 years of growth.  A self-actualizer doesn’t necessarily have to display all these elements of character.  As stated previously, this is a process.  As long as you’re able to look at the list and see some of them reflected in your growth path, then you’re on the right track.

Here is the list direct from Maslow’s Motivation and Personality, Chapter 11, “Self-Actualizing People: A Study Of Psychological Health”:

1) More Efficient Perception of Reality and More Comfortable Relations with it

Self-actualizers have a keen sense of realism. This includes the ability to correctly judge people because they can detect false and dishonest people. They live more in the real world of nature than the man-made abstractions, beliefs and stereotypes most people confuse as the world. They are logical and rational, perceiving what is real rather than their own (or other’s) wishes, hopes, anxieties or beliefs. They’re not frightened or threatened by the unknown or ambiguous; rather, they often desire and welcome it.

 

2) Acceptance (Self, Others, Nature)

Self-actualizers accept themselves and others as they are. Because they more clearly perceive reality, they see human nature as it is and not as they would prefer it to be.  They accept it and don’t give it much concern or thought, viewing any deficiencies as neutral personality characteristics.  Because of this they tend to lack guilt, shame, inhibition or anxiety – enjoying life free from these burdens, without regret or apology.

 

3) Spontaneity; Simplicity; Naturalness

Self-actualizers are relatively open, spontaneous and unconventional – in both thoughts and behavior. They’re not confined by norms – not allowing rules and regulations they feel are trivial to prevent them from achieving their important goals.  Although unconventional, if the situation calls for it, they will go through the ceremonies and rituals of convention with a good-humored shrug and with the best possible grace.

 

4) Problem Centering

Self-actualizers focus on problems that are outside of themselves (problem-centered) rather than problems within themselves (ego-centered). They typically have a mission in life to fulfill which enlists their energies – tasks they feel compelled to do for others. They feel it is a calling to serve a greater cause. They’re concerned with basic issues and eternal questions in the philosophical and ethical realm. They live in the widest possible frame of reference, a large horizon, a broad vision, never losing sight of the forest due to the trees – focusing on the big picture.

 

5) The Quality of Detachment; the Need of Privacy

Self-actualizers positively like and desire their solitude and privacy. Since they’ve moved beyond deficiency needs and are focused on growth, they don’t need others in the ordinary sense. They don’t need external reassurances, or other’s opinions. They’re very independent and use their time for developing their own individual potential. This detachment is often viewed by others as aloof, cold, snobbish, and unfriendly.  They’re objective, strong self-starters who are active, make up their mind and are responsible for their own decisions and destinies. They’re not pawns who are helplessly “determined” by others.

 

6) Autonomy; Independence of Culture and Environment; Will; Active Agents

Self-actualizers are independent and not reliant on their main satisfactions coming from their external environment or other people. They are “self-contained.”  While deficiency-motivated people need others available to satisfy their lower hierarchy needs (safety, love, respect, prestige, belongingness), growth-motivated people are actually hampered by others. Their satisfactions come from within rather than from outside social interactions.

 

7) Continued Freshness of Appreciation

Self-actualizers have the wonderful capacity to repeatedly appreciate, freshly and naively, the basic goodness of life, with awe, pleasure, wonder, and even ecstasy, however stale these experiences may have become to others.  They experience a richness of subjective experience in the form of joy, ecstasy, pleasure, inspiration and strength – whether in music, beauty, nature, people, or even in the basic elements of life. They don’t take their blessings for granted and maintain a sincere gratitude for life.

 

8) The Mystic Experience; The Peak Experience

Self-actualizers experience moments that Maslow called mystic or “peak” experiences. This is an intensification of any experience in which there’s a loss of self or transcendence of it.  The experience can provide feelings of limitless horizons, the feeling of great ecstasy and wonder and awe, the loss of placing in time and space, and finally, the conviction that something extremely important and valuable had happened.  The individual is to some extent transformed and strengthened even in his daily life by such experiences. The intense feelings do not come all the time but occasionally and at the most unexpected moments.They can also occur in lesser degrees of intensity.  While one would be apt to identify this as a religious or supernatural experience, it’s actually a natural experience.

 

9) Gemeinschaftsgefühl (Identification with mankind)

Gemeinschaftsgefühl, a word invented by Alfred Adler, describes the feelings for mankind expressed by self-actualizated people: it’s an identification with humankind. They have a genuine desire to help the human race, as if they were all members of a single family. Even though the self-actualized person is very different from other people in thought, impulse, behavior and emotion, they have a deep sense of empathy for those around them. They are often saddened, exasperated, and even enraged by the shortcomings of the average person, yet however far apart they are from them at times, they nevertheless feel a basic underlying kinship with them – much as an older brother.

 

10) Interpersonal Relations

Self-actiualizers have deeper and more profound relationships than any other adults. They’re capable of deep ties and greater love than other people would consider possible. However, these especially deep ties occur with only a few individuals.  They have a small circle of friends and these relationships are likely to be healthier and closer than the average person – much closer.

 

11) The Democratic Character Structure

Self-actualizers are friendly with anyone of suitable character regardless of class, education, political belief, race, or color. As a matter of fact it often seems as if they are not even aware of these differences, which are for the average person so obvious and so important. They find it possible to learn from anybody who has something to teach them – no matter what other characteristics he may have. They share a quality that could be called humility of a certain type – humble before people who can teach them something that they do not know or who have a skill they do not possess.

 

12) Discrimination Between Means and Ends, Between Good and Evil

Self-actualizers are fixed more on the ends rather than the means. The journey is just as enjoyable and important as the arrival. Very few are religious in the orthodox sense, but they have strong ethical and moral standards and are certain about what’s right and wrong (although their notions of right and wrong and of good and evil are often not the conventional ones).

 

13) Philosophical, Unhostile Sense of Humor

Self-actualizers are often seen by the average person as rather sober and serious. Their sense of humor is not of the ordinary type. They don’t find humor in making fun of people in a hurtful, denigrating way.  Philosophically-oriented, thoughtful humor is more to their liking – poking fun at foolishness or inflated egos – even laughing at themselves. Think of it as humor with a message.

 

14) Creativeness

Self-actualizers are creative in a youthful, childlike manner.  They retain a fresh, naive and direct way of looking at life. Most people lose this as they become enculturated, but not those who are self-actualized….. they’re more spontaneous, more natural, more human. They do things without inhibition and with spirit and insight of perception. They’re not necessarily gifted with a “special” talent such as playing the piano or writing literature or poetry, but display more of an uninhibited, youthful, creative expression – like young children.

 

15) Resistance to Enculturation; the Transcendence of any Particular Culture

Self-actualizers maintain a certain inner detachment from the culture in which they’re immersed. They’re autonomous and less molded by societal influences. They may appear to be culturally adapted in terms of what they wear or their social practices, but it’s not a genuine “buy in.”  If cultural conventions are too annoying or troublesome, they rid themselves of this superficiality and focus on what’s important to them.  They’re not radical rebels, but if needed – they could be. They’re primarily intellectual in nature and have a mission of something important to improve the world. They’re not likely to make useless sacrifices – being more of a realist.

“Everything in your life is a reflection of a choice you have made. If you want a different result, make a different choice.” – Unknown

 

It’s Your Choice.

Life is about choices.  Our lives are the sum total of the consequences of our choices.  Choose to be more.  Choose to pursue your potential.  Choose to self-discover.  Choose to adventure in Growth and Self-Actualization!

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”  – Mark Twain

 

“Human life will never be understood unless its highest aspirations are taken into account. Growth, self-actualization, the striving toward health, the quest for identity and autonomy, the yearning for excellence (and other ways of phrasing the striving “upward”) must by now be accepted beyond question as a widespread and perhaps universal tendency . . .” – Abraham Maslow, 1954, Motivation and Personality

 

Self-actualizing people enjoy life in general and practically all its aspects, while most other people enjoy only stray moments of triumph.” – Abarham Maslow

 

“Growth takes place when the next step forward is subjectively more delightful, more joyous, more intrinsically satisfying than the previous gratification which we have become familiar or even bored. – Abraham Maslow

 

 

Some decent online sources:

 

As with any sourcing on the internet, links can go ‘dead’ after a time. If you find the above-mentioned links no longer working, try the WayBack Machine:  http://archive.org/web/web.php    It’s sometimes a good way to pull up and view websites that are no longer active.

 

 

Values – Personal Core

 

What Exactly Are Values?

Value can fall into several arenas:

  1. Economic – the material worth of something compared to the monetary price paid.
  2. Utility/Importance – something held in high regard due to its usefulness or importance to you.
  3. Aesthetic – this could technically be a part of Utility/Importance, above, but has a more specific relation to art, beauty, harmony and nature such that it elicits a pleasurable experience for the viewer.
  4. Personal-Core/Ethical – what’s most important to you in life; the guiding principles of your life that dictate action & behavior; it defines who you are.

The primary focus of this article is #4 – Personal Core values.  These are principles, standards or convictions we feel are deeply important to our lives.  Theoretically, these elements of our core should drive our daily activities and behavior – serving as a compass or beacon for our actions.  They are instilled in us culturally throughout our life as we grow and learn.

Rarely, though, does anyone attempt to actually identify their core values.  Because of this, and the chaos and lack of focus they experience daily, they find themselves with a nagging feeling something is missing.  Let’s change that.  Let’s live life with self-confidence and direction. Let’s make better and more confident decisions.  Let’s eliminate the time vampires in our lives if they don’t align with our values.  Let’s embrace what’s really important and drive up our joy and happiness quotient.

 

A “Default” Life

It’s so easy to get caught up in the day-to-day chaos.  Our attention is yanked left and right by the pressing urgency of our work & personal lives, and this is compounded by HUGE distractions thrown in our face every day via daily news drama.

If we choose NOT to take an active role in our life direction, it takes zero effort to allow our lives to be pulled into the mire of mundane chaos, depression and hopelessness that seems to surround us.  Days, weeks, months and years pass by; what have we really accomplished?  Are we happy? Or are we frustrated and exhausted?

Did we do what’s required of us in our job?  Did we do what’s required of us for our family, spouse, kids?  Did we do what’s required of us by any social or religious organizations? Did we vent a sigh of relief when we finally were able to sit and idle our minds and body once our daily regimen of responsible duties are complete?

Then……what did we do?  Did we tackle the important things in our personal lives that matters to us as individuals?  Did we pick up the activities we consider passions and pursue them with satisfied pleasure?  Or, were we too pooped-out for our passions?

This describes a “default” life – trying to live by a myriad of other values rather than yours (friend’s, church, education, professional/career, political, etc.).  The result is dissatisfaction, restlessness and anxiety . . . knowing something isn’t right . . . your life isn’t in control.

 

Moving Towards Living a ‘Designed’ Life

By identifying your core values you can live a more directed life, make more intelligent and better decisions, and focus on the things that really matter to you.  Having these values in the forefront of your mind helps you clearly identify priorities, eliminate drains on your time and energy, and enjoy a more focused, joyful life. You don’t get yanked about in an aimless direction by anything and everything that comes your way.  We should strive to live a life by “design” rather than by “default.”

Don’t get me wrong, the myriad of demands and choices doesn’t stop coming your way.  But by knowing your core values you’re prepared to take a stand and make decisions about what you focus upon.

 

How to Identify Your Core Values

This type of activity can be found in personal improvement books and websites.  You can simply Google core values or core values list and find many sites with lists and exercises to accomplish the task.

A couple of the best sites I found are linked below.  Each of these requires you to spend some time on introspection and reflection rather than just picking values from a list:

A couple of sites that have nice lists of values:

 

There are many benefits of living around your core values: satisfaction, contentment, happiness, fulfillment, purpose, meaning, peace of mind, self-confidence, harmony, success.  These are the result of living an authentic life without confusion, guilt or shame.

“It’s not hard to make decisions once you know what your values are.”  – Roy E. Disney

 

Is this activity producing value?

You’ll feel a sense of discovery and satisfaction after developing your list of top values.  Review it periodically as a continual reminder of what’s deeply important to you.

Each day, find ways to focus on activities that align with those values.  Eliminate as many activities and areas of focus that do not align.  (I wouldn’t recommend quitting your source of income, unless you have your dream job already lined up.)

The minutes of your life are finite.  Use them the best way possible, rather than squandering them aimlessly.  Make your life the best it can be.

Consider some of the following throughout your days and weeks:

  • Are the hours of my life creating value for me?
  • Does the decision I’m about to make align with my values?
  • Is the activity I’m about to partake in going to produce value in my life?  Does it support my core values?
  • Is the purchase I’m about to make going to provide value to my life?  Does it support my core values?

 

My Values

I went through an exercise five to ten years ago to identify my values.  They are (in no particular order):

  • Discovery/Learning/Knowledge, Truth/Accuracy, Beauty/Aesthetics, Growth/Self-Actualization, Freedom/Self-Reliance/Individualism, Integrity, Justice, Results, Creating/Building

Yes, this is more than the 5 or 10 the articles suggest.  However, I resonate with all of them and enjoy the reminder of their importance to my life.  Ultimately these values are what drove my selection of the Categories and Sub-categories used on this blog.

I use these to identify my life’s goals and document the important focal activities to pursue in something called a Strategy On A Page (SOAP).  This SOAP includes a list of those values plus areas of aligning focus for my life’s interests and pursuits.  I reference this through the year to ensure alignment to what’s most important.

The whole process of identifying and embracing my values has created more happiness and contentment in my life – a goal we should all embrace!

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”  – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

 

As with any sourcing on the internet, links can go ‘dead’ after a time. If you find the above-mentioned links no longer working, try the WayBack Machine:  http://archive.org/web/web.php    It’s sometimes a good way to pull up and view websites that are no longer active.

 

 

 

 

Carpe Diem!

Over the last several months my wonderful wife bought some really nice pop-open cards, all titled “CARPE DIEM.”  She hides them here-and-there for me to find and writes something sweet on the back of them.

1029162348a_hdrAfter popping open the perforated cover of the card, inside each is a quote that shares an inspiring thought for personal growth and self-actualization.  This is particularly nice because it fits right into the niche I’ve been passionately pursuing for the last couple of decades – to learn, to grow, to live fully, to expand my horizons!

Some of the quotes:

“Plunge boldly into the thick of life, and seize it where you will.”   – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

“Visualize this thing you want. See it, feel it, believe in it. Make your mental blueprint and begin”     – Robert Collier

“If you want your life to be a magnificent story, then begin by realizing that you are the author and everyday you have the opportunity to write a new page.”    – Mark Houlahan

“… parade through each day convinced that every task… brings you closer to fulfilling your dreams.”     – Og Mandino

“Don’t count the days, make the days count.”     – Muhammad Ali

“Know the true value of time; snatch, seize, and enjoy every moment of it.”     – Earl of Chesterfield

“Live daringly, boldly, fearlessly.”     – Henry J. Kaiser

“The future is always beginning now.”     – Mark Strand

“Wake up with a smile and go after life.”     – Joe Kapp

“Make each day your masterpiece.”     – John Wooden

“It’s time to start living the life you’ve imagined.”     – Henry James

“The future starts today, not tomorrow.”     – Pope John Paul II

“We know nothing of tomorrow; our business is to be good and happy today.”     – Sydney Smith

“What we do today, right now, will have an accumulated effect on all our tomorrows.”   – Alexandra Stoddard

“Each day comes to me with both hands full of possibilities…”     – Helen Keller

“Dare to live the life you have dreamed for yourself. Go forward and make your dreams come true.”     – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Let the winds of enthusiasm sweep through you. Live today with gusto.”     – Dale Carnegie

“Go for it now. The future is promised to no one.”     – Wayne Dyer

“Each day comes bearing its own gifts. Untie the ribbons.”    – Ruth Ann Schabacker

“Grab life by the handlebars.”     – Unknown

 

 

What is “Enriched Living?”

I wanted to call this category “Renaissance Living” but didn’t want to appear presumptuous or portray something I’m not. Ideally my attitude over the last 25 years has been to try and mimic the adventurous spirit of discovery that my grandmother, Elsie Lacy, embraced in her life. For me, growing up as a child, my grandmother was a beacon of getting out of her comfort zone and experiencing as much about life and culture as she could.

She didn’t have a college education but she didn’t let that deter her spirit of adventure. I’ve never been clear if she always had elements of being a renaissance woman throughout her life or just in her last 25 to 30 years. She read voraciously, she painted in oils, she learned to play the organ, she would take me and my brothers everywhere. She would take us to the fair each year and didn’t shy away from walking through the livestock pavilion and dodging animal droppings everywhere – making sure we visited everything. Some of the other places she wanted to make sure I experienced:

  • The old river wharf with its old boats
  • Regular trips to the library
  • The old Seventh Street train depot to see a vintage steam engine
  • A civil rights march in the 60s
  • Speed Art Museum
  • Shakespeare In the Park
  • Historic neighborhoods with their beautiful homes
  • Parks throughout Jefferson County
  • The Devonian fossil beds on the river
  • She took my youngest brother on a train trip to Florida to visit her son’s family

It seemed like her goal was to expand her (and her grandchildren’s) wings far beyond the mundane daily lives of most people. She even told me she shot the Falls of the Ohio in a canoe when she was a teenager. Now, that’s what I call living!

Her influence affected my greatly. I’ve always seemed to want to build, create, read, learn, discover, travel, see, do, experience – seizing as much of the vibrancy of life as possible.

My goal is to become the maximum individual I can be in this brief time on Earth; to delve into as many passions and interests as possible; and to learn and discover as much as possible.

 

So, for me, Enriched Living includes . . . .

  • Growth & Self-Actualization
  • Wonder & Living Enriched
  • Finances & Prosperity
  • Purpose & Vision

 

Growth & Self-Actualization

Move beyond self-imposed limitations. Learn and discover as much as possible. Cultivate a deep desire to constantly refine and change – to grow to my maximum. To live with an extremely high level of self-confidence. Challenge my beliefs and paradigms. Expand both my right (artistic) and left (analytic) sides of my brain. Live beyond the mundane. Question, seek, discover, soar. Create and savor an awesome, enriched life.

 

Wonder & Living Enriched

Seek out and appreciate beauty and wonder wherever it can be found. Satiate the soul by experiencing and creating beauty. Feed your passion for a full and meaningful life. Embrace gratitude. Live the life you imagine. Get things done. Don’t be a couch potato. Experience as much as you can. See as much of the world as you can. Live as much of a Renaissance life as possible. Expand your horizons.

 

Finances & Prosperity

Define your own success and prosperity. Practice some sound financial behavior. Eliminate your debt. Plan for your retirement but don’t entirely abandon a pleasant life now for a distant future. Understand “want” versus “need.” When is enough, enough? Live enriched without spending unwisely. Make smart decisions – not simply what everyone else is doing.

 

Purpose & Vision

Identify your mission in life. What is your purpose? What is a vision versus goals? Do some life planning. Visualize. Don’t aim too low. Tackle big stuff by ‘chunking’ it into more sizable bites. Live intentionally and passionately. Seek truth. Relish in the spirit of discovery. Think for yourself. Control your own destiny. Don’t go to the grave with the song still in you.

 

Enriched Living . . . .

Ultimately you should have an inner sense of genuine satisfaction, sincere gratitude, wonder and awe at the beauty of nature and resonating art, a high-level of self-confidence and growth satisfaction. Make sure you get out of your comfort zone and experience as much as possible. Create your own personal aesthetic at home that resonates with your soul (your “Elysium”).

Don’t forget that there’s even a beautiful aesthetic in discovery of little-known truths and elegant knowledge. Seek truth, beauty and freedom.